Local Dancer to open Pole Dancing school in South Africa


Zimbabwean pole dancer-cum-rapper Tiara Baluti says she wants to establish a pole dancing school in South Africa this year as a way to sustain her love for arts.

The 22-year-old rapper who has so far released two videos titled Roll Up and Ndavapedzera along with four singles, said the school would run concurrently with an online channel as she would love to impart the skill to willing individuals as well as demystify what the art entails.

“I will start my own school, teaching people how to pole dance because pole dancing and stripping are two different things,” she told The Standard Style.

“It is an art whereby you can express your feelings through the pole so I will also open a YouTube channel where I will be teaching people on the internet and I think that will help people to understand what it really is because it is also good for exercising and stretching muscles.”

Baluti, who will this week move to South Africa, said Zimbabweans should embrace pole dancing.


“People need to embrace pole dancing and I think there is need to try other new things you know, because it is a matter of the heart, just do what you feel, do not think of what people are going to say,” said the bubbly rapper.
Dancing in its different forms has been associated with low-income locally, prompting most dancers, among them sought-after rauchsters Bev Sibanda, Zoey Sifelani and recently Lady Storm (Eriza), to turn to music without much luck.

Meanwhile, Baluti is set to release an album titled Two Sides of a Coin in June that will be accompanied by a collaboration single with a “big South African artist”.

The upcoming musician, who exudes confidence coupled with a profound appetite of perfection as displayed by her two videos said she is set to take female emceeing to the next level.

“I am just a female rapper that is going to make it with no record label although I can feel a big record label coming my way soon,” she said.

“I think I have no competition in the game, that is what I see and I really want to change the game in Zimbabwe because female emcees are lacking in some areas, so I think it is high time to be more powerful and take up any kind of rapping.”

She also bemoaned corruption in the music sector saying it was a huge blow to the genre. She claimed some disc jockeys were demanding “tips” to give music airplay.

“It is a game of money, some people might be talented but may not have money to pay the DJs on radio stations. But people should be fair, listen to the music and not judge depending on how much money they are given.”

Baluti’s debut video that currently has more than 6 000 views on YouTube has found its way to Zambezi Magic TV while some of her tracks are on local radio charts.

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