Zimbabwean Musicians and their favourite singers

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From the various interviews conducted by this publication last week, it is evident that music granddad Oliver “Tuku” Mtukudzi is one of the few, if not the only local artiste that most of our singers are comfortable naming as their favourite.

THE adage that a traditional healer cannot cure him/herself also applies to musicians.

No matter how brilliant musicians are, each and every one of them also has a favourite singer. Just like you and me, they have songs from fellow artistes that they dance to or even play on repeat.

After all, if politicians can take time to read each other’s manifestos, what would stop artistes from following each other’s work?

However, only a handful of established artistes are willing to divulge their preferred local singers.

In fact, it is very rare to get into a musician’s car or home and find them playing music from perceived rivals or colleagues in the industry. Doing so is generally considered as a form of submission and competitor propping.

Often, when musicians are in the company of “strangers”, they play their own released or yet to be unleashed music, ostensibly to master the lyrics and further improve the quality.

In other instances, the artistes find it easy to settle for any of the six national radio broadcasting stations.

However, the way in which musicians blend impromptu on stage at various live gigs is clear testimony that they at times give “special” attention to each other’s works.

From the various interviews conducted by this publication last week, it is evident that music granddad Oliver “Tuku” Mtukudzi is one of the few, if not the only local artiste that most of our singers are comfortable naming as their favourite.

Perhaps apart from his unmistakable brilliance, it is also the music superstars’ accomplishments and age that wipes direct competition between him and his counterparts, automatically making him an easy pick for the favourite local artiste choice.

Below is what some of the few selected artistes said last week with regards to their preferred music.

Suluman Chimbetu

It would be a lie if I told you that I have a specific artiste that I follow. A fact and truth is I don’t like African movies but I love Telemundo soaps and action movies. I get music from aspiring and budding musicians regularly thus I spend most of my free time listening to their stuff. In that regard, I end up with less time to follow one particular artiste.

Mai Charamba

As an artiste I have a lot of fellow musicians that I listen to and the choice is determined by a number of factors. With some I share common musicianship while I give others attention after discovering their music in the big pool of local music that I often have in my collection. However, In Zimbabwe, I mostly listen to the music of my husband Pastor Charamba (Charles), Mercy Mutsvene and Gospel Power. Across borders I follow the work of Ron Kenoly, Michael W. Smith, Don Williams, The Mbambos from South Africa and Benjamin Dube.

Oliver Mtukudzi

I love good music and that is what I listen to. My bias though is towards African artistes. This is the reason why I also prefer African movies ahead of western movies. It is, however, difficult for me to single out any local artiste(s) that I prefer most because those that I will leave out might complain. What you just need to know is I listen to anything good. If the music is bad, I don’t give it a chance.

Cynthia Mare

Tuku is my favourite artiste. He sings the message I like, I also like his voice and above all, I respect him. If it was in the movie world I would equate him to Ironman or Batman since I like superhero movies.

Jah Prayzah

Naturally I’m a fan of music but my favourite artistes are mudhara Tuku and the late Lucky Dube.

I also listen to Zim dancehall although I only look for their compilation albums, riddims, and not individual projects. Film wise I’m a fan of black American movies. They inspire my compositions.

Winky D

Internationally, I listen to all good music. However, I have a special bias towards other reggae greats from the time before Bob Marley up to dancehall legends like Beenie Man. I feel great musicians always transcend the defined walls of musical genres. I always give an ear to anything that carves out a kind of artistic inspiration to strengthen resolve in me to live beyond the boundaries set by challenges. Locally, I listen to anything trending at any particular time. Anything that affirms that there can never be limits to growth but rather fortifies the spirit.

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